Restructure and Redesign

Kayla Alcorcha and Nathan Bingham

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The Gaucho Gazette, the newspaper you are holding in your hands right now, will cease to exist after this semester; the publication will continue as a magazine starting next fall. Although journalism as a concept will never disappear, the field is rapidly changing to accommodate the comfortability of the average reader. Similarly, The Gaucho Gazette is adapting to current social trends in an effort to further engage the student body. Core components of the publication will be reformed, including the size, the subjects, and the name; we prompted prospective journalism students to voice their thoughts on these proposed transformations.

Freshman Wynne Pringle speaks about her appreciation for the newspaper and acknowledges its current aesthetic deficits.

“I like the newspaper…it brings up current events, things that are happening now. In my opinion, that’s what a lot of people want to read,” said Pringle. “[However], I think people would appreciate it more if it looked nicer and [were] more visually appealing.”

The new components of color and gloss convey the feeling of modernization. Traditional, monochromatic newspapers are often associated with older generations; thus, the transition towards an all-color magazine reflects the youthful vibrancy of its intended adolescent audience.”

— Kayla Alcorcha

In order to achieve augmented levels of aesthetic desirability, and increased readership by extension, The Gaucho Gazette has decided to change the structure of its staff: Two new positions, Art Director and Extended Content Editor, have been established to ensure the visual and compositional cohesiveness of the magazine. The former position is characterized by the creative elements that comprise the publication, many of which will experience extensive alterations. In addition to different layouts and designs, each page of the magazine will be printed in color; these contemporary artistic aspects will enhance the external attractiveness of the magazine and, ideally, compel more people to leaf through it.

By attracting new readers with updated visuals, the articles of the new magazine will be able to reach a broader range of students rather than solely its dedicated readers. Additionally, the new components of color and gloss convey the feeling of modernization. Traditional, monochromatic newspapers are often associated with older generations; thus, the transition towards an all-color magazine reflects the youthful vibrancy of its intended adolescent audience.

Junior Cecilia Aden expresses her thoughts on the aforementioned aspects of the future publication, specifically the novel implementation of color.

“Magazines fit in with pop culture…in a newspaper, everything seems to blend together. [A magazine] looks new, looks bold, and more aesthetic to the eye which in turn draws fondness [from readers],” said Aden.

This modern perception is precisely what The Gaucho Gazette is attempting to accomplish with the impending redesign. Though the content currently printed in the newspaper is important, traditional layouts impede creative freedom as well as significant student exposure; with adjustments to design and content, the transition from a newspaper to a magazine will reflect societal developments and communal changes.

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